We show you the dirty customs that dismantle one of the great lies about the rich and noble of the Middle Ages

We are tired of seeing in the movies and TV series that recreate the Renaissance era to wealthy nobles living in cotton, wearing immaculate clothes and smelling roses while the rest of society lives in the most miserable rot. [19659002] However, as often happens in movies, everything is a huge lie, pure facade. The truth is that at that time the armpit of the noble smelled like the poor.

 We show you the dirty customs that dismantle one of the great lies about the rich and noble of the Middle Ages

As the writer said bourgeois Sandor Marai in his memoirs "Confessions of a bourgeois" where he explained that even in the nineteenth century was thought that washing was harmful to the body.

At that time, the bathtub worked more as a decorative element than as a tool for the hygiene. Only one day a year, the day of San Silvestre, the bathtub regained its original use.

So strange was the approach to soapy water that at the end of the 19th century people only bathed when they were sick or were going to get married

 We show you the dirty customs that dismantle one of the great lies about the rich and noble of the Middle Ages Although it may seem like a real hooligan, it was a fairly common practice until very recently, and could be worse … In fact, if we lived in the eighteenth century, we would bathe once in a lifetime. Can you imagine?

The truth is that this aversion to water is not a scourge that we come dragging from the past. In fact, in antiquity people were not so dirty. As we already know, the Romans spent a lot of time in collective baths as part of the extreme cult to the body that they professed.

 We show you the dirty customs that dismantle one of the great lies about the rich and noble of the Middle Ages
renaissance

This custom came to the East, where the Turkish baths became authentic centers of social life. Even in medieval times people bathed with some assiduity and made their needs in public latrines.

It was the arrival of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, when the Puritan conception of the body that began to be promoted, which made the hygiene personal began to go to hell.

For some reason, one of the supposedly more educated guilds of the time, doctors, argued that the water weakened the organs and opened the pores thus facilitating the entry into the body of all kinds of diseases

 We show you the dirty customs that dismantle one of the great lies about the rich and noble of the Middle Ages
revival

This nonsense acquired such force that it even began to spread the idea that a good coat of grime protected against diseases, so that the personal hygiene should be done in "dry".

Also, if for some reason you decided to keep your private parts clean s ran the risk of suffering the scourge of the Church, which condemned the bath to consider it an unnecessary and sinful luxury.

The habit of not stepping into a bathtub of its own accord was not exclusive of the poor classes, the rejection of water it reached even the highest spheres of society. At that time, a woman who stepped into the bathroom twice a year could be considered an example of neatness. Even the king was given a bath only by medical prescription and of course, taking the necessary "precautions."

Queen Isabel of Castile, fervent Catholic, boasted of having washed only twice in his life, after birth and the day before your wedding. Something normal among the palatial class of the fifteenth century

 We show you the dirty customs that dismantle one of the great lies about the rich and noble of the Middle Ages

It took two centuries for the population will accept the bath as a necessary evil. In the seventeenth century, what we call the "annual bath" became popular, where once a year the family took a bath in a hot tub.

The baths, when they took place, were taken in a huge tub filled with water. Hot water. The father of the family was the first to take it, then the other men of the house in order of age and then the women. Finally came the turn of children and babies, which could be lost in the already black water.

The seventeenth-century French playwright, Paul Scarron, described in his book 'Le Roman comique' a scene of personal hygiene in the which the protagonist only used water to rinse his mouth.

 We show you the dirty customs that dismantle one of the great lies about the rich and noble of the Middle Ages
renaissance

With the intention of taking advantage of the bathroom of the annual that took place in May, most of the marriages were celebrated in the month of June, in this way, the smell of the person (in this case the couple) was still tolerable.

Anyway, a month Whole without knowing a little soap is enough to smell rays, that's why brides used to carry bouquets to disguise the bad smell. Thus the tradition was born to celebrate marriages in May and June and that brides are accustomed to wearing a nice bouquet of flowers.

Until the middle of the 19th century, bathing did not become a frequent practice. First when the need demanded it, then once a month, and then, once or twice a week.

 We show you the dirty customs that dismantle one of the great lies about the rich and noble of the Middle Ages

Although women were not recommended to wash their private parts, this practice was still related to infertility. Nor could they bathe during the period, a belief that in some circles is maintained today.

Over time, hygiene returned to normalize and the hygiene products industry began to emerge to this day.

Luckily , the lack of hygiene is a thing of the past. If it is difficult to put up with your composure when you travel in the subway with someone sweating next to you, imagine walking through one of those cities. What a nightmare!

Do you think you could live in this stinking bygone era? Leave us your opinion in the comments!

Share with all your friends!

Source: Martians Historiaybiografias Wikipedia [19659036] // PubGuru
    window.pgjs = window.pgjs || {};
    pgjs.gdpr = pgjs.gdpr || {};
    pgjs.publisher = pgjs.publisher || {};
    pgjs.publisher.name = 'Rolloid';
    pgjs.publisher.privacyPolicy = 'https://rolloid.net/aviso-legal/';
    pgjs.gdpr.consentDuration = 90;
    pgjs.publisherCookieWrap = function () {
      pgjs.loadJS ('// m2d.m2.ai/m2d.rolloid.alldevices.min.js');
      pgjs.loadJS ('https://www.googletagmanager.com/gtag/js?id=UA-60478166-1');
      window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || [];
      function gtag () {dataLayer.push (arguments); }
      gtag ('js', new Date ());
      gtag ('config', 'UA-60478166-1');

! function (f, b, e, v, n, t, s)
  {if (f.fbq) return; n = f.fbq = function () {n.callMethod?
  n.callMethod.apply (n, arguments): n.queue.push (arguments)};
  if (! f._fbq) f._fbq = n; n.push = n; n.loaded =! 0; n.version = '2.0';
  n.queue = []; t = b.createElement (e); t.async =! 0;
  t.src = v; s = b.getElementsByTagName (e) [0];
  s.parentNode.insertBefore (t, s)} (window, document, 'script',
  'https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js');
  fbq ('init', '278045765975631');
  fbq ('track', 'PageView');

    }
  

What do you think?

0 points
Upvote Downvote

Total votes: 0

Upvotes: 0

Upvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Downvotes: 0

Downvotes percentage: 0.000000%